10 Good Reasons to Study After Retirement

After working for over 40 years, one is retired, that is, the person is given a rest, especially because of old age. But does this mean that one must not carry out any other activity? Above all, is one too old to go back to school? Far from it for there are some very good reasons for studies when one leaves office or employment. In this article we will look at 10 of them.

Studying for pleasure

While working, some people felt strong attraction for Art and Design, Calligraphy, Composing music, Singing, Drawing, Garden Design, Interior Design, Painting, Photography, Sculpture, Writing and other fields of study but never really had the time to develop their passion. Others embraced their passion but had to put them on hold because of the pressure of careers, marriage and parenthood.

Trained or untrained, qualified or not, such people find retirement a great opportunity to explore their passion just for pleasure. Not surprisingly, many old students take courses in that pursuit or for personal development, thus satisfying the urge for ‘that something I’ve always wanted to do.’ All that these pensioners want is the sheer pleasure of learning a new skill or developing a dormant one. However, after studying for a while some pensioners find they could continue for a qualification and do so.

Studying for personal gratification

Some people did not have the opportunity to get the education they needed because of circumstances like poor parents, sickness, war, working early, etc. And all their working lives they felt miserable about missing out on school. Retirement therefore becomes the time to prove to themselves that they could have done it. And doing it makes them feel good about themselves.

study abroad

Studying for academic achievement

If you are a person who has the desire to make use of your skills and also to gain greater knowledge of a field of study you had been dying to go into, retirement could offer you that opportunity. Pensioners who studied after leaving employment say that gaining a degree after they had retired gave them a purpose and interest. Studies made them use their time properly and regain the skills that they never had at work.

Satisfying this urge may be demanding for a pensioner than the first two. Wanting a degree, diploma or certificate means one must do an accredited course which leads to a qualification. One is therefore at best planning their path from the beginning and sticking to a rigorous program. For, to gain the necessary points the students work has to be assessed and they must achieve passing grades. This may not be really difficult because of the enthusiasm and the experience the pensioner brings to the classroom.

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *